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Updated 19:42 21/02/20

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Milled Coins


View a comprehensive range of Milled Coins at BullionByPost. We stock both gold milled coins and silver milled coins, ranging from Crowns and Florins to Guineas and Shillings.

Milled or 'machine-struck' coins were the successor to hammered coins and utilised modern machinery to produce the coins at a faster rate and with greater consistency than hand-made production.

To view our range of Hammered Coins, click here.

1777 Guinea Gold Coin

Awaiting Stock

from £964.50

Buy

1688 James II Guinea Gold Coin

Awaiting Stock

from £966.50

Buy

1771 George III Guinea Gold Coin

Awaiting Stock

from £968.10

Buy

1715 George I Gold Guinea - Fine

Awaiting Stock

from £970.10

Buy

1786 Guinea

Awaiting Stock

from £974.50

Buy

1767 Guinea Gold Coin

Awaiting Stock

from £1,020

Buy

1701 Gold Guinea William III

Awaiting Stock

from £1,085

Buy

1773 George III Guinea Gold Coin

Awaiting Stock

from £1,087

Buy

1832 - Gold Sovereign XF 45

Awaiting Stock

from £1,100

Buy

1731 George II Guinea

Awaiting Stock

from £1,111

Buy

1689 Gold Guinea William and Mary

Awaiting Stock

from £1,160

Buy

1679 Gold Guinea Charles II

Awaiting Stock

from £1,238

Buy

1792 George III Gold Guinea

Awaiting Stock

from £1,265

Buy

1722 George I Gold Guinea -

Awaiting Stock

from £1,272

Buy

1722 George I Gold Guinea

Awaiting Stock

from £1,272

Buy

Milled coins first came to exist in 1550 in Europe following a surge in demand and a desire to protect against counterfeit production. Low-quality coins were being produced by Mints in an attempt to match demand, which made them easy to 'clip' to steal precious metal from the edges.

It was the French who struck first and moved to mechanical production - a decision designed to help France get an edge over the Holy Roman Empire. An unnamed French engineer - believed to be Marx Schwab - designed the new screw press and within a year France had a mechanised mint called the Moulin des Étuves.

In 1560, Queen Elizabeth I orchestrated a Great Recoinage in Britain and mechanised production came to England, though France, Britain and the rest of Europe didn't wholly adopt milled coins until many years later.