HIGH DEMAND: Due to very high demand, orders may take up to 5 working days to be dispatched - Click here for our latest update

Open menu Close menu Menu
Open charts menu Close charts menu Charts

Call us: 0121 634 8060, 7 days, 7am - 10pm

Free Insured Delivery

Ounce Gram
Gold £1344.58 £43.229
Silver £17.072 £0.5489

Updated 07:16 29/11/20

£ $

SALE: 3% off everything*Gold Coins SalePrices cut on thousands of products. All orders include free insured delivery.

Shop Gold Coins

Shop Gold Bars

SALE - 3% off everything*

Prices cut on thousands of products. All orders include free insured delivery.

Henry V Coins


Henry V was King of England from 1413 – 1422. Despite his short reign, military victories in France helped secure his legacy as a key King.  Henry V coins were limited in numbers and denominations, making them scarce to find. As one of the Kings of the House of Lancaster these coins from the time of Henry V will make fine additions to any collection.

Predecessor : Henry IV | Successor : Henry VI

1413-22 Henry V Hammered Silver Penny

Awaiting Stock

from £250.20

Henry V Gold Quarter Noble - Fine

Awaiting Stock

from £861.70

1413-22 Henry V Gold Half Noble Class G

Awaiting Stock

from £2,117

Henry V was also known as Henry of Monmouth; his nickname was derived by his place of birth – the gatehouse tower of Monmouth Castle in Wales. He was the son of King Henry IV, and Mary de Bohun, making him the great-grandson of King Edward III.

A Lancastrian uprising overthrew Henry’s cousin – Richard II – and placed his father on the throne. When his father died in 1413, he finally became King Henry V, at an approximate age of 26.

His reign was short, and domestically peaceful. Much of his time was spent in France as part of the Hundred Years War. The Battle of Agincourt saw King Henry V successfully defeat French forces.

Henry V coins include the Penny, Halfpenny, and the Groat in silver, with the Noble, and Quarter Noble commonly found for gold currency.

Henry died suddenly in 1422, at the age of just 35. Dysentery was originally believed to be the cause of death, but historians have also pointed to heatstroke. His last day of action saw him riding in full armour in high temperatures. His son, Henry VI, succeeded him to the throne at the age of just nine months old.

Information Pack

Find out more about us with an information pack sent direct to you through the post.

Start typing a postcode or address to search.

Newsletter

Sign up for our latest news, insights, updates and offers.